2 - 5 December 2019
| Munich, Germany

Conference Day One

7:30 am - 8:20 am Registration and welcome coffee

8:20 am - 8:40 am Opening by chairman

Dr. Riccardo Mariani - VP Industry Safety, NVIDIA
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Dr. Riccardo Mariani

VP Industry Safety
NVIDIA

• First thoughts and feedback on real life implementation from International WG members
• Introduction of the timeline for the 3rd edition and when to expect the next ISO meetings
• What should new interested parties know for getting involved
• Setting up the conference expectations and key areas to be addressed 
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Dr. Riccardo Mariani

VP Industry Safety
NVIDIA

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Dave Higham

Principal Functional Safety Engineer
Imagination Technologies

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Ghani Kanawati

Technical Director Functional Safety
ARM

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Yves Renard

Automotive BU Functional Safety Manager
ON Semiconductor, Belgium

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Riccardo Vincelli

Director of the Functional Safety Competence Center
Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH

• During this second part of the panel discussion, we welcome on the stage representatives from Tier 1s and OEMs for addressing concerns in product complexity and traceability.
• An opportunity for car maker representatives to discuss challenges they currently face with electronic suppliers.
• Safety mechanisms vs product availability: Is there such thing as too much safety? What are the expectations of car makers on system availability for highly automated features 
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Dave Higham

Principal Functional Safety Engineer
Imagination Technologies

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Dr. Riccardo Mariani

VP Industry Safety
NVIDIA

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Yves Renard

Automotive BU Functional Safety Manager
ON Semiconductor, Belgium

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Riccardo Vincelli

Director of the Functional Safety Competence Center
Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH

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Ghani Kanawati

Technical Director Functional Safety
ARM

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Dr. András Balogh

CTO E/E Competence Center
Thyssenkrupp

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Pradeep Biddappa

Autonomous Drive, Systems Architect - Functional Safety
Volvo Cars

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Mike Bucala

Vehicle Systems Quality Engineer/ Functional Safety Manager
Daimler Trucks North America

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Lisa Clark

Senior Functional Safety Manager
Veoneer

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Dr. Wolfgang Freese

Global Manager Functional Safety
Aptiv

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Dr. Tomislav Lovric

Chief Engineer Corporate System Safety
ZF Group

9:40 am - 10:10 am Supplemental FMEA for Monitoring and System Response - Application to Functional Safety-Relevant Systems

Mike Bucala - Vehicle Systems Quality Engineer/ Functional Safety Manager, Daimler Trucks North America
Traditional Design FMEA addresses fault detection prior to production. FMEA-MSR adds real value by assessing the capability of diagnostic detection and fault reaction to reduce the risk of harm or regulatory noncompliance in customer operation.
• New metrics are introduced (Frequency and Monitoring)
• New risk assessment method is introduced (Action Priority)
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Mike Bucala

Vehicle Systems Quality Engineer/ Functional Safety Manager
Daimler Trucks North America

10:10 am - 10:40 am Match and Meet

10:40 am - 11:10 am Coffee break

11:10 am - 11:40 am Safety analysis - How to better integrate a FMEDA in the Tier1 system level

Lisa Clark - Senior Functional Safety Manager, Veoneer
• Understanding what needs to be done to integrate it more easily
• Changes that need to be made to accelerate this process
• Finding the right level of abstraction
• Looking into the future
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Lisa Clark

Senior Functional Safety Manager
Veoneer

11:40 am - 12:10 pm Achieving a traceable design and IP methodology for ISO 26262 compliance

Michael Munsey - Vice President Business Development and Strategic Accounts, Methodics, Inc. USA
While solutions exist for traceability for requirements, design and verification, these solutions are often not connected and error prone when information attempts to be shared. This presentation will discuss:
• How to automate traceability from requirements through design to verification
• Automating the documentation of the traceability


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Michael Munsey

Vice President Business Development and Strategic Accounts
Methodics, Inc. USA

12:10 pm - 12:40 pm Lessons learned integrating Artificial Intelligence (AI) /Machine Learning (ML) Accelerators into complex ISO 26262-Compliant Systems-on-Chip

Kurt Shuler - Vice President of Marketing, Arteris IP
Diego Botero - Functional Safety Engineer, Arteris IP
Describes lessons learned and best practices for integrating AI / ML hardware accelerators and processing elements into ADAS and autonomous driving SoCs using Network-on-Chip (NoC) interconnects.
• Integrating legacy hardware accelerators that have no/limited safety mechanisms into systems with an ASIL
• Protecting interfaces, protocols and signaling
• Accelerator subsystem checking, isolation, and other integration issues


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Kurt Shuler

Vice President of Marketing
Arteris IP

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Diego Botero

Functional Safety Engineer
Arteris IP

12:40 pm - 2:10 pm Network luncheon

System development is a jigsaw puzzle with a lot of pieces. Pieces can be anything like semiconductor components, software or even subsystems. They are safety elements out of context (SEooC). Such SEooCs can have various sizes of scope and are sometimes kept fuzzy for flexibility. Bringing those pieces together is a non-trivial task that challenges the integrator with:
• Boundaries: What does the SEooC take care of? Which assumptions of one SEooC are already satisfied by another element? What remains to be done?
• Flexibility: If assumptions allow flexibility, is there guidance on how to apply to the specific use case? If assumptions are optional, is there guidance for arguing the tailoring?
• To facilitate the task, puzzle pieces must be easy to combine.
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Dr. Martin Oberkönig

Senior Staff Elect. Design Engineer
Cypress Semiconductor GmbH

Mixel and Renesas will present a flow for developing and certifying Mixed-Signal IP based on ISO 26262 functional safety as a SEooC and integrating the IP within Automotive Application SOC.


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Ahmed Aboul-Ella

Engineering Manager
Mixel Inc.

Serge Di Matteo

Director Functional Safety and Design Quality
Renesas

3:10 pm - 3:40 pm The value of 3rd party certificates for legacy IPs

Dr. Karol Niewiadomski - Product Manager, Cyber Security, SGS-TÜV Saar GmbH
Despite of the publication of ISO 26262 2nd edition in 2018, there are still a lot of so called ‘legacy IPs’ on the market, which have not been developed under the ‘ISO 26262 umbrella’. These IPs are, of course, suitable for being applied in safety-related applications, however, an appropriate, documented ‘evidence’ is missing in many cases. ISO 26262:2018 introduced different complexity classes in order to qualify legacy IPs. However, due to the complexity of certain components, it is difficult to apply / fulfil these requirements. 3rd party certificates might help to analyze, evaluate and to support these designs.


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Dr. Karol Niewiadomski

Product Manager, Cyber Security
SGS-TÜV Saar GmbH

3:40 pm - 4:10 pm Refreshment break and networking

4:10 pm - 4:40 pm Case study of using STPA to derive assumptions for SEooC for HW IP

Dave Higham - Principal Functional Safety Engineer, Imagination Technologies
The system theoretic process analysis (STPA) according to MIT is a much discussed risk and hazard analysis method. Get a better understanding how to apply it for SEooC.
• Overview on STPA
• Case Study
• Lessons learnt
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Dave Higham

Principal Functional Safety Engineer
Imagination Technologies

4:40 pm - 5:10 pm FSC development from Vehicle to Component Level

Dr. Wolfgang Freese - Global Manager Functional Safety, Aptiv
Systematic development of FSCs from vehicle down to component level is key to get wellstructured set of requirements specifications meeting completeness and correctness criteria on all levels. However, authors tend to specify technical requirements at the earliest stage possible having implementation solutions in mind. The presenter will show how the quality of requirements can be improved by staying on function level as much as possible and change to technical level only in the last phase before implementation. This has most impact on both ends of the development. HaRa is usually done on vehicle functions such as braking, or steering. HaRa can be done on higher level, i.e. on functions directly perceived by drivers. On the other hand functional safety requirements for SEooC’s are much more maintainable and much better to integrate into an overall concept than technical requirements. 
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Dr. Wolfgang Freese

Global Manager Functional Safety
Aptiv

5:10 pm - 5:40 pm From requirements to ranufacturing – Infineon‘s safety process demonstrated (a position sensor example)

Harish Venkataraman - Senior Staff Functional Safety Engineer, Applications Engineering, Infineon Technologies Austria AG
The talk will center around Infineon’s safety philosophy, primarily in the Sense and Control business line, as a supplier to Tier 1/Tier 2 companies, and to OEMs. I will describe in detail my experiences with customer interfaces(DIA vs. SEooC), describing Functional Safety Requirements, and therefore deriving Technical Safety Requirements, the Safety Concept development process along with the Safety Analysis procedure up to product manufacturing/testing/support. I will use a Position Sensor example.
• Safety Philosophy elucidated
• Supplier viewpoints
• Innovation through the process (customer documentation, safety analysis)
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Harish Venkataraman

Senior Staff Functional Safety Engineer, Applications Engineering
Infineon Technologies Austria AG

5:40 pm - 5:50 pm Closing remarks by chairman

Dr. Riccardo Mariani - VP Industry Safety, NVIDIA
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Dr. Riccardo Mariani

VP Industry Safety
NVIDIA

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Evening event

Join our evening Get-Together in the Augustiner Keller and take the opportunity to network and make new business contacts. or just to relax and round off your first conference day.